Month: September 2014

Notes on Dress Normal: The GAP and the Normcore Movement

Dress Normal: The GAP and the Normcore Movement Only recently has the GAP realized that it has been unintentionally perpetuating the Normcore movement for the past forty-six years. Or maybe they’ve known the entire time. With Oxford button downs, plaid shirts, and chino pants, the GAP has been a hallmark of the unisex wardrobe–offering traditionally fashionable clothing at reasonable prices for the sector of the population that doesn’t know what they want, but prefers not to shop at Walmart or some other discount retail chain. *Full disclaimer: I shop at the GAP. But not for those reasons per se. Let’s just say I have a very mild fashion sense living on a modest budget. The kind of person that doesn’t have the patience or the desire to put together matching outfits for every occasion, but still wants to look presentable (whatever that means). I guess you can add sociopath to the list of potential clientele. Yet that’s also why the GAP’s new advertising campaign to “Dress Normal” is so problematic–not that I’ve heard any particular …

Notes on the film ‘Frank’

Frank is a 2014 film by Lenny Abrahamson starring Michael Fassbender as the titular character, an eccentric, yet earnest musician that also happens to wear a giant paper-mache head (a reference to English musician and comedian Chris Sievey and his longtime comic persona, Frank Sidebottom). The film follows Frank and his band (Soronprfbs) as they welcome a new member (Domhnall Gleason) and try to record an album at an isolated property located in Ireland. Afterwards, they attempt to play an important show at SXSW, which ultimately reveals some of the deep-rooted psychological issues that the film’s somewhat bizarre premise suggests. Mental illness is never really the main focus of the film, but rather the antecedent and eventual falling action of the plot itself. Frank’s creativity is never questioned in this regard; though there is some assumption that the paper-mache head is what allows him to adopt the persona we observe during the first two acts of the film. The irony is that mental illness and creativity do not produce a positive corollary, but in some …