Month: May 2014

Notes on Spike Jonze’s “Her” 

I’m going to make the assumption that enough people were distracted by the unusual premise of the film Her (either dismissing it entirely or intrigued by its novelty), that they probably overlooked the underlying theme present in the story. More than just a commentary on “love as a socially acceptable form of insanity,” as its tagline suggests, the film also makes a compelling argument for what often contributes to the failure of a relationship: distance, or rather in this case, proximity. It’s not difficult to notice how much access Samantha has into Theodore’s life or the mutual curiosity they have for one another. It happens instantaneously. She reads his emails, helps to organize his schedule, and accompanies him almost everywhere he goes. It’s the kind of forced intimacy that begins to place an unknown boundary between them, especially with Theodore possessing a certain emotional leverage throughout their courtship–a role he, somewhat naively, takes to without hesitation. And so they eventually decide to cross that threshold (barring one drunken night, let’s assume it happens either way). …